One of Portland’s oldest neighborhood associations, the Downtown Neighborhood Association was formed in 1977 to improve the livability of the central city.

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Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association
Portland Downtown Neighborhood AssociationTuesday, February 21st, 2017 at 10:44am
New pizza shop opening in the West End of Downtown! The shop is on SW 13th between SW Stark and SW Washington, behind Lola's Room.
Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association
Portland Downtown Neighborhood AssociationTuesday, February 21st, 2017 at 7:22am
PBOT Traffic Advisory:
West Burnside to be closed intermittently Tuesday, February 21st, between NW Hermosa Blvd and SW Barnes Rd for landslide clearing

(Feb. 20, 2017) – The Portland Bureau of Transportation advises the traveling public that West Burnside will be fully closed to all traffic between NW Hermosa Blvd and SW Barnes Road intermittently from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday to allow Portland Parks & Recreation tree crews to safely remove large trees from a landslide near the roadway.
Work hours have been timed to reduce the impact to the traveling public, while ensuring safe working conditions. Work is being coordinated so Portland General Electric crews can cut off power to the area to make it safe for tree removal.
People traveling in the area should use alternate routes, and consider using NW Cornell Road or U.S. 26. People walking or driving on West Burnside in the closure area should expect brief intermittent delays of up to 20 minutes at times as crews work to fell large trees. This stretch of road was the site of a landslide last week, and City engineers continue to monitor the area for further earth movement.
We ask the public to observe all lane closures and directions by signs, reader boards and flaggers, and use alternate routes if possible.
Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association
Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association shared a link.Sunday, February 19th, 2017 at 6:23am
Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association
Portland Downtown Neighborhood AssociationSaturday, February 18th, 2017 at 6:07am
Dine for an excellent cause this weekend!
Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association
Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association shared KGW-TV's post.Friday, February 17th, 2017 at 2:26pm
Mayor's office is opposed to moving R2DToo to the parking lot on SW Market and SW Naito.
Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association
Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association shared KGW-TV's post.Friday, February 17th, 2017 at 8:10am
A Home for Everyone is doing AMAZING work on reducing homelessness in Portland. They targeted their efforts and limited resources on achievable areas and in doing so, they were able to make a real impact. The best part about the A Home for Everyone is that it is a JOINT EFFORT between the City and the County, which reduces some of the haphazard responses we've seen from our elected officials.

About the Downtown Neighborhood Association

 

Portland Downtown Neighborhood Association is: people who live, work, go to school, or own businesses in Downtown Portland. We work together and with the city of Portland to improve safety and livability, address transportation and land use issues, and build community. The a PDNA is one of the primary sources of public input for city bureaus and officials as they make decisions about Downtown development. Through position statements, public testimony, and participation in citizen advisory groups, the PDNA and its members weigh in on critical decisions that shape the future of life in Downtown Portland. If you’re interested in getting involved, come to a meeting, become a member, and join our mailing list.

Downtown History

First Congregational Church

 

Completed in 1875, the bell tower of the First Congregational Church at SW Park and SW Main stands 175 feet tall. It’s a landmark in Downtown, and its height made the the church the tallest building in Portland for 60 or so years. Designed by Swiss architect Henry J. Hefty to resemble the Old South Church in Boston, the church is one of a few examples of Venetian Gothic architecture in the U.S., and its stained glass windows were created by Povey Brothers Studio in 1906. The church’s bell is still rung by pulling a rope, and can be heard every Sunday throughout the South Park Blocks.